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August 1st, 2018

Multi-stakeholder partnerships to finance and improve food security and nutrition in the framework of the 2030 Agenda

Published by High Level Panel of Experts on Food and Nutrition Security,

This report (PDF) by the High Level Panel of Experts on Food and Nutrition Security¬†clarifies the concepts of multi-stakeholder partnerships (MSPs) and identifies the challenges. There is a growing recognition that the food security issue requires a cross-sectoral and holistic approach, for example via MSPs. The growing importance of MSPs however raises questions about the benefits, limitations, performance and relevance of MSPs. The primary benefit of MSPs is the mobilization and coordinated use of complementary resources. MSPs can also improve mutual understanding among partners, facilitate policy convergence and consensus building. A major challenge is the tensions that can appear among partners in a MSP, for example generated by conflicts of interest. Thereby, MSPs can reproduce existing power asymmetries and strengthen the position of more powerful actors. MSPs can also be more time, energy and resource consuming than when acting separately. HLPE suggests eight qualities that shape MSPs’ performance. Three result-related: effectiveness, impact and capacity to mobilize resources. Five process-related: inclusiveness, accountability, transparency, reflexivity and efficiency. The links, synergies and trade-offs between these qualities have to be considered when assessing MSPs’ performance. The report comes with a number of pathways to improve MSPs and finishes with a number of recommendations. One recommendation is to establish a policy framework to ensure that MSPs effectively contribute to the progressive realization of the right to adequate food. Hereby, states should consider the role of MSPs when developing strategies for achieving national food and nutrition security (FNS) goals, and ensure that legal and regulatory frameworks promote transparency and accountability. Another recommendation is to improve mobilization, coordination and targeting of financing for FNS through MSPs. States and intergovernmental organizations should promote innovative ways to mobilize domestic and international public financing of MSPs through the use of various mechanisms.

A summary of the report can be found here. 

Curated from fao.org