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Access to finance: Information transparency system cocoa farmers in Ghana

GCP 2 Transparancy information system for cocoa farmers Kenya
Image: via Flickr (by: Tulane Public Relations)
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Project description

This project examines whether the introduction of a farmer information platform improves cocoa farmers’ access to finance. By closing information asymmetry between financial institutions and farmers, the former is more likely to offer financial services to the latter. Technology is expected to reduce know-your-customer and transaction costs of reaching out to smallholders.

Aim: The cocoa industry has for years been characterised by high and growing demand and low and declining supply. As a result, prices of cocoa have been increasing, and sustainability of the crop questioned. Many public-private partnerships have addressed productivity issues in the short term. However, long-term sustainability of cocoa farms and attractiveness of the sector to future generations of farmers will depend on farmers’ ability to get access to input supplies and other services, for which they need credit. Some of the main reasons why cocoa farmers have no access to credit include no hard collateral, high-perceived risk and transaction costs, high moral hazard (cocoa side selling) and low financial literacy of farmers. The aim of this project is to test how a farmer information system can help farmers get access to finance by reducing transaction costs, moral hazard and risks, at low cost and large scale.

Objective: The overall objective of this research is to show to what extent farmer information transparency provided by the ICT system can be used to attract financial institutions to lend to cocoa farmers, encouraging information as a reputational collateral and thus, a risk management tool.

Method: We aim to measure the causal impact of the information system by using both quantitative and qualitative impact evaluation techniques. The quantitative and qualitative components complement each other and enable triangulation. The qualitative analysis is necessary to provide key insights on details of how the information system influences the different stakeholders, especially cocoa farmers, but also purchasing clerks, and financial intermediaries. Moreover, the qualitative analysis can help to obtain information about variables that are difficult to quantify. We will also use conduct indepth interviews with financial intermediaries to get more detailed information about how they value information systems in relation to credit supply and credit terms. The qualitative component will also allow us to better assess the reliability of the quantitative outcomes, and to check other causal assumptions of the theory of change. The quantitative analysis focuses on the attribution question. After having measured impact of the information system, we aim to conduct cost-effectiveness analysis e.g. by using benchmark secondary data collected during the baseline.

Country: Ghana.

Dutch policy goals: Inclusive business models for food security; and Regional trade for food security.

Duration: September 1, 2015 – August 31, 2020

 

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