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April 5, 2017Knowledge Portal
Enhancing the Uganda pig value chain through capacity building and multi-stakeholder platforms

This research brief by the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) highlights specific action research and capacity development interventions to address identified challenges and generate evidence for wider applicability along the pig value chain in Uganda. The smallholder pig value chain in Uganda was identified by the CGIAR Research Program on Livestock and Fish as a sector where research investment was most likely to make a major difference to the livelihoods of poor people. »

December 6, 2015Knowledge Portal
Perceptions and practices of farmers on the utilization of sweetpotato, and other root tubers, and banana for pig feeding in smallholder crop-livestock systems in Uganda

This study highlights the major practices and strategies deployed by pig farmers in response to feeding constraints in Uganda. While there is potential for the use of sweet potato and other root tubers as pig feed in the smallholder pig farming systems, their use is limited due to the lack of knowledge. »

June 16, 2015Knowledge Portal
New biogas plant improves waste management in Kampala pig abattoir

Projects led by the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) and partners are improving waste management at Wambizzi, the only pig abattoir in Uganda, as part of wider efforts to improve pig production and pork marketing in the country. A new biogas plant, funded by ‘More Pork For and By the Poor’, transforms waste from the pig slaughterhouse into methane gas. »

May 12, 2015Knowledge Portal
Global trends in antimicrobial use in food animals

This study by experts from Princeton University, ILRI and other institutions is the first to measure global antibiotic consumption by livestock. Antimicrobials are used in livestock production to maintain health and productivity, however these practices contribute to the spread of drug-resistant pathogens in both livestock and humans, posing a significant public health threat. The paper »